What Gastroparesis Does

If you aren’t familiar with gastroparesis, you are lucky. Many people don’t realize that it’s much more than feeling full/bloated/nauseated and vomiting (though it IS all of those things). It affects blood sugars.

Here is a perfect example.

up, up, and away....
up, up, and away….

I ate around 2:30pm. I stayed surprising low – my BG never peaked. In fact, I needed a juice box at one point because I was 77 and dropping just an hour after eating. That juice box did the trick and everything seemed fine again….then out of nowhere, I started skyrocketing. I was in class just as it began and I was shocked at how fast I was going up. My CGM shows my blood sugar going up over 150mg/dl in the space of about an hour to an hour and a half from where my BG started.

….Apparently my food was digesting, when I no longer had any IOB to help me out. I rage bolused for SIX HOURS to try to get my blood sugar under control. I did it but I’m angry….

I’m angry I had to drink that extra juice early on, right after I ate (those extra calories add up!). I’m angry I had to give SO MUCH extra insulin because I essentially had to bolus for my meal TWICE…once when I ate, and again when I actually digested it.

Gastroparesis is still new for me. It’s still sporadic. I don’t have flare-ups daily. Sometimes my flare-ups don’t do much to my BGs, sometimes they do. There is no pattern to any of this yet.

For anyone out there who deals with gastroparesis and diabetes: I’m sorry. This sucks. For anyone with gastroparesis that has advanced to a point you are feeding via a tube/you can’t handle solid foods: you are my heroes. Seriously, I can’t imagine that and how difficult it must be.

Do any of my readers/followers have gastroparesis? Share stories, tips, advice, etc. if you want!

Still Satisfied

Back in November of 2013 I wrote a blog post about how great I think my endocrinologist is (My Endo is Super) and I continue to feel that way.

Lately I’ve seen a lot of people complaining that, while they want to do better with their own diabetes care…they aren’t getting the support they want or need from their endos.

I’ve seen stories of people whose endos will not write them RXs for a CGM because ‘they are only for people who can’t feel their lows….it’s an abuse of health insurance funds for anyone else to use one’.

I’ve seen stories of people who have lowered their A1c levels and instead of getting the pat on the back they expected, they were told ‘this is dangerous…you cannot maintain this without a lot of lows’ (despite the fact that many of these people are NOT experiencing a lot of lows, and are still maintaining A1c levels well above ‘normal’).

I’ve seen stories of people being told that their A1c levels in the mid-7s are ‘perfect’ and they don’t need to aim for anything lower.

Personally….I think all of those endocrinologists are a little bit crazy. Either way, I’m thankful they are not my doctors, because if they were….I’d have to completely disregard them, their comments, and their ‘recommendations’.

I remain thankful that I have an endocrinologist who sees the value in a CGM for ANYONE with diabetes who is self-motivated to care for themselves the best they can. I remain thankful that I have an endocrinologist who can celebrate A1c levels below 6 (complete with happy dances, high fives, and sticking his head into the hallway to brag to the CDE across the hall about what he and I have accomplished) instead of chastising me. I remain thankful that I have an endocrinologist who realizes that we can handle low blood sugars in a way that doesn’t require him to tell me that my A1c must remain over 7. I remain thankful that I have an endocrinologist who knows I can and trusts that I will change my rates and ratios as needed to react to patterns and changes in my reactions to insulin. I remain thankful that, if I do have a question, I have an endocrinologist who will email me back within 24 hours – he has even emailed me at 1 or 2am in the past. I remain thankful that I have an endocrinologist who saw something questionable in my eyes and recommended I see a retina specialist (who diagnosed me with retinopathy) or heard something strange in my heart beat and recommended I see a cardiologist (who diagnosed me with a form of tachycardia and put me on medication to control it)…a doctor who didn’t waste time getting colleagues with more knowledge of certain health conditions involved in my care. I remain thankful that I have an endocrinologist who has never questioned my desires when I’ve wanted to switch insulin pump brands (even when Tandem was brand new and he’d never heard of them before….he told me he’d do some research on it, and within a day he was emailing me back to say it looked awesome and he’d be pleased to help me get a t:slim, if that’s what I wanted) or glucose meters, so have needed all new RXs. I remain thankful that I have an endocrinologist who is involved in diabetes advocacy (he was the American Diabetes Association’s Wisconsin Chapter President in 2013) OUTSIDE of his work-day.

More and more lately, while hearing from others in the DOC, I realize just how lucky I am to have found the endocrinologist I have….and I am more and more convinced I do not ever want to be in a position where I can’t see him anymore or have to switch to another endo for insurance reasons, etc.

Do you like your own endocrinologist? Do you feel he/she could do a lot better at supporting you? I’m interested in hearing from all of you….

Blood Sugars: A study in photos of my Dexcom G4

Throughout most of my time with diabetes I’ve known what affects my blood sugars; after all, it’s fairly obvious, if testing BG enough, to determine whether something causes a rise or a fall in BG levels. However, it wasn’t until I got my Dexcom back in May that I fully realized just how much some things affect my BGs (or how much I’d be affected by my Dexcom…)

If you don’t have a Dexcom….have you ever wondered what it looks like when you are sick? Stressed? Eat something you shouldn’t have? Eat something you didn’t think you should have and found it had little effect at all?

Since May I’ve taken a series of photos of my Dexcom receiver. Here are some of the photos I find most telling about living with T1 diabetes:

I've got a pretty good handle on how to bolus for sushi
I’ve got a pretty good handle on how to bolus for sushi
Being served the wrong drink at a restaurant should be a crime
Being served the wrong drink at a restaurant should be a crime
Diabetes likes to keep me up at night
Diabetes likes to keep me up at night
My Dexcom has an attitude problem....
My Dexcom has an attitude problem….
Some days are super awesome and everything goes right
Some days are super awesome and everything goes right
It's just not worth being too aggressive with the glucose tabs or the juice...
It’s just not worth being too aggressive with the glucose tabs or the juice…
Sometimes I think my beta cells are still active, and get joy out of f*cking with me....
Sometimes I think my beta cells are still active, and get joy out of f*cking with me….
Being sick makes diabetes act like a roller coaster, regardless of food intake (this was a day I was sick enough that I didn't eat)
Being sick makes diabetes act like a roller coaster, regardless of food intake (this was a day I was sick enough that I didn’t eat)
Stress has amazing powers on the body. This was the rise during my grandfather's funeral, and the crash back down
Stress has amazing powers on the body. This was the rise during my grandfather’s funeral, and the crash back down
Highly processed pastas like mac and cheese are not my friends....
Highly processed pastas like mac and cheese are not my friends….
Apparently ice cream has very little affect on my BGs. This is just one image, of three that I have, of similar flat-lines after whole pints of ice cream, DQ Blizzards, etc. Ice cream is a safe food for me and my diabetes.
Apparently ice cream has very little affect on my BGs. This is just one image, of three that I have, of similar flat-lines after whole pints of ice cream, DQ Blizzards, etc. Ice cream is a safe food for me and my diabetes.

Test Strips No Longer Covered….and a note about my blog

I’ve hit a strange impasse with my insurance company (Anthem BCBS). They no longer cover ANY test strips except OneTouch brand strips. All other strips cannot be charged to my insurance. OneTouch strips can be, and I pay a $55 copay for them.

What makes me shake my head in wonder at the stupidity of the insurance company is that by asking me to switch back to OneTouch….they are asking if they can pay more every month for my strips. Like….$100 more per month. Yep…despite having a copay I’d have to pay for OneTouch, the insurance company would also be losing $1200 per year by asking me to switch test strip brands. Yet….they stupidly are doing so.

Anthem BCBS: No wonder you have to raise premiums.  You are costing yourselves MORE money by insisting that every diabetic on your policies use the most expensive test strip brand in the world. Yes, OneTouch makes awesome meters. Yes, they are popular. But…you can’t deny that their strips cost more than any others, anywhere….

I had switched to a ‘generic/store brand’ meter to lower costs, both for me and my insurance company.  That’s no longer ‘allowed’. I’m just so baffled by this choice.

Anyway, I’m not willing to pay $55 a month for strips, when just last year I was paying $0 a month for strips.  I will be switching from the Agamatrix premium meter (made for Target stores) and buying a Relion Prime meter at Walmart….I can buy my 250 strips a month without involving insurance at a cash/retail price of $45…..$10 less than my copay on my insurance’s ‘preferred brand’.

Does anyone else see anything wrong with this picture?

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And a note about my blog: I am more than happy to receive emails from those with questions or who want to talk about something I’ve mentioned in my blog. However, if you are asking me to include links in my blog that have NOTHING to do with me or my blog or my reasons for doing anything I do (wearing a pump, using a CGM, etc)….I won’t respond. Mostly because it’s obvious you haven’t actually READ my blog. Please don’t ask me to include links that have no relation whatsoever to anything I’ve ever written. Please don’t ask me to include ‘official’ links for products that are only the official links if I live in the country you are marketing from. I live in the USA. I will link only USA website version links, unless one doesn’t exist and then I will link the page I deem most appropriate to an American audience (I realize my blog is read by people around the world….but 95% of the people who read this blog ARE from the USA…and I often talk about products that I use that are only available in the USA or a few select other countries…).

Pump Me Up!

If you haven’t heard, there’s been some exciting news in the insulin pump world lately.

Here in the USA the long-awaited Animas Vibe is now FDA approved and you can pre-order your pump before their official release sometime next month.

The Animas Vibe integrates an Animas pump (like the Ping…but without the remote meter) with a Dexcom G4 system, displaying CGM readings right on the pump’s screen.

In addition, Medtronic has released their new 640G system in Australia. The 640G is a completely updated pump, in terms of looks. It includes a full color screen instead of the old pager-style screen Medtronic is known for. It continues to integrate the Medtronic CGM with the pump, and also comes with a remote meter. This is a huge win for Medtronic because this is a key feature the Animas Vibe is missing.

Personally, I am not a Medtronic fan but their new pump looks cool. I love my Dexcom however, so integration for me has to involve a Dexcom. I’d love to test drive an Animas Vibe, but I ultimately am holding out for the much anticipated t:slim G4 insulin pump (the t:slim with integrated Dexcom) to be FDA approved.

(Speaking of t:slim there are rumors of a t:flex, which will have a 480 unit reservoir for those with insulin resistance and/or Type 2 who may need to use larger daily doses being released sometime in 2015, and there continue to be whispers of a t:dual which is a dual chambered pump capable of holding both insulin and glucagon – in theory, for use in a closed loop/artificial pancreas system.)

So many exciting things for those of us with D to consider in our arsenal of tools!

New Diagnoses

So a while ago I posted about gluten. Since then, here is what has happened: I continued to eat gluten free for about 2 months…..then I fell off the bandwagon for a bit because I realized that I was still experiencing some nagging symptoms that just didn’t seem to be resolving by cutting out gluten. Over the next 2 months I ate about 95% gluten free – so I definitely had moments of ‘cheating’.  Over Thanksgiving and the weekend afterward I ate quite a bit of gluten (with at least one meal each day) and on Monday I was very ill.

However, my symptoms still didn’t quite add up to me: a lot of them can be associated with celiac disease or a gluten intolerance, but many of them cannot.

On Tuesday I had an appointment with my endocrinologist and I explained everything to him – how I’d been feeling throughout 2014, my symptoms that seemed to be related to/coincide with the consumption of gluten and my symptoms that seemed to have no relationship to gluten consumption….several of which involved strange things happening to my blood sugar levels.

As I talked, his facial expression changed and I knew he was going to say what I didn’t want to hear: ‘I think you have gastroparesis’.

He ordered a few antibody tests for celiac, despite knowing I had only been consuming gluten regularly for the past 5 days and intermittently before that….meaning the result might come back with a false negative.

He prescribed Reglan for my nausea/vomiting (though I am apprehensive to use it as the side effects are scary, so I’ve only taken 2 of them in the past 2 days – despite being prescribed enough that I could in theory take 3 per day) and to stimulate digestion. He advised me to begin cutting fat and fiber from my diet and asked me to keep him up to date on whether these small adjustments are helpful or if I develop new symptoms.

Today the antibody tests came back – I am on the borderline between a negative and a positive result  (by a one point difference). Considering I hadn’t even been regularly consuming gluten, my doctor says he believes me to have celiac disease but he can’t officially put that into my record without a lab result to support it, so for now it’s not being documented. He wants me to eliminate all gluten from my diet now, however, so my gut can begin to heal. Once my gastroparesis symptoms are further under control we will talk about reintroducing gluten to see if we can absolutely confirm a celiac diagnosis.

He said that as far as the gastroparesis is concerned he wants to do a gastric emptying test and upper endoscopy…but not yet. He wants some of the celiac damage to heal first, if I do in fact have celiac disease (which, like I said, he’s fairly sure I do). There is one symptom I’m having, as of today, that concerns him and may result in needing an endoscopy and/or colonoscopy in a quicker timeframe to rule out any other issues or damage to my GI tract.

So….yeah. Gastroparesis AND celiac disease.

I’m one lucky lady.

For future tests I’m going to have to find a GI doctor…and I think I want to meet with a dietician to help me figure out what the heck I can eat…because a lot of the safe foods for celiac disease are NOT safe foods for gastroparesis, and vice versa.